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Rewarding Work

Rewarding Work

Working conditions for a substantial part of the U.S workforce have declined markedly in recent decades. Wages have stagnated for most workers and have fallen for the most vulnerable populations in our society. State leaders can work to reverse this decline and rebuild the American Dream through a number of key programs.

Court Upholds Employer Health Care Responsibility Policies

In a case with national implications for state health reform across the country, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals this week in Golden Gate Rest. Ass'n v. San Francisco upheld the employer responsibility provisions of the San Francisco universal health care plan. The decision follows a preliminary decision earlier in the year that allowed the plan to be initially implemented.

Protecting Worker Freedom from Mandatory Meetings

Protecting Worker Freedom from Mandatory Meetings

Thursday, March 6th, 2008

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States Criminalizing Immigrant Workers through State "Identity Theft" Legislation

States Criminalizing Immigrant Workers through State "Identity Theft" Legislation

Thursday, February 28th, 2008

Labor Day: How States Can Protect Workers Rights

http://www.progressivestates.org/dispatch

Thursday, August 30, 2007

Labor Day: How States Can Protect Workers Rights

Labor Day: How States Can Protect Workers Rights

In honor of Labor Day, we thought we would highlight some of our past Dispatches which outline steps states can take to protect workers' rights and raise wage standards. With new Census data showing that the median income for working-age households is still $1,300 below 2001 when the last recession hit bottom, the need for states to act to improve working conditions is greater than ever.

Living Wage: Maryland Enacts First State Law in Nation

This week, Maryland became the first state to enact a "living wage" law, HB 430, requiring government contractors to pay their employees a decent wage, in the bill ranging from $8.50 an hour in rural areas to $11.30 an hour in areas of the state with higher costs of living.  Maryland follows the 120 local governments around the country that have required that public money go to companies that pay their workers above the poverty line.