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Minimum Wage

Low-Income Tax Relief, California Health Care and Public Financing in Washington

Low-Income Tax Relief, California Health Care and Public Financing in Washington

Thursday, January 31st, 2008

How Exploited "Independent Contractor" Truckers Drive Pollution in Our Ports

It's well-known that deregulation of the trucking industry has led to worse working conditions in the industry and lower safety standards on the road. But new coalitions are focusing on the way conditions in the trucking industry contribute to pollution that chokes trucking hubs like our ports.

Labor Day: How States Can Protect Workers Rights

In honor of Labor Day, we thought we would highlight some of our past Dispatches which outline steps states can take to protect workers' rights and raise wage standards. With new Census data showing that the median income for working-age households is still $1,300 below 2001 when the last recession hit bottom, the need for states to act to improve working conditions is greater than ever.

Living Wage: Maryland Enacts First State Law in Nation

This week, Maryland became the first state to enact a "living wage" law, HB 430, requiring government contractors to pay their employees a decent wage, in the bill ranging from $8.50 an hour in rural areas to $11.30 an hour in areas of the state with higher costs of living.  Maryland follows the 120 local governments around the country that have required that public money go to companies that pay their workers above the poverty line.

A Case Study in the Minimum Wage

The New York Times looks at the neighboring towns of Lewiston, ID and Clarkston, WA. The neighboring cities lie just opposite eachother, separated by the state border. They're also separated by an economic border -- Idaho's minimum wage is $5.15. Washington's is $7.93. When Washington embraced its higher minimum wage, some business owners cried bloody murder.

CA: A Living Wage for Airport Hotel Workers

This week, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa approved a new city law requiring hotels near the LAX airport to pay the same living wage as those companies receiving government contracts: $9.39 an hour if the hotels provide health insurance or $10.64 an hour without benefits.

Stopping Privatization Profiteering

A number of state leaders have been promoting what seems like a free lunch. Hand over control of government services to private industry and those companies promise better service at a lower price. Like most promises of a free lunch, privatization has mostly ended up being a deceptive boondoggle, a point the non-partisan news sourceStateline.org emphasized this past week: