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Georgia

Some States Wasting Money on Job Bidding Wars and Corporate Subsidies

Overall, federal recovery spending is working as intended, helping states provide needed services and avoid layoffs that would be worsening unemployment rates.  The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities estimates that these funds are providing states with 40 percent of what is needed to help their budgets in balance over the next few fiscal years.  The recovery plan has provided states with flexibility in addressing key programs and priorities. Unfortunately, a number of states have wasted budget funds on trying to steal jobs from one another, as highlighted by Good Jobs First.

PSN makes state voices heard in DC health care debate

As battle lines are drawn on Capitol Hill over the coming battle over health care reform, Progressive States Network is putting state legislators in the middle of the national debate. On Wednesday, PSN led a delegation representing over 700 state legislators to Washington D.C. to deliver a letter to the Obama Administration and Congress urging them to pass comprehensive health care reform with a public insurance option by the end of the year. The letter, which was signed by a bipartisan group of over 700 legislators from 48 states, called for any federal reform bill to include a public health insurance option, strong affordability protections, and shared employer responsibility for health care costs.

Georgia Legislative Session Roundup

Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue signed around 350 pieces of legislation into law, but took few steps forward as budget debates consumed the legislature. Some better bills included the nation's first mandatory reporting of food contamination tests by food processors, enacted after a Georgia plant released salmonella-laced peanuts. The passage of the budget bill (HB 119) trimmed the state's spending by $3 billion rather than raise taxes.

Georgia Becomes 2nd State to Require Proof of Citizenship to Vote

Following Arizona's lead, Georgia has passed a law requiring that all residents prove their citizenship before they can register to vote.  This is the most restrictive form of voter ID yet, and it is far more restrictive than the photo ID requirements that have been passed across the country.  It has been enacted even though there is no indication that non-citizen voting is a problem in the state; in fact, Georgia election officials are confident that the current photo ID requirement is strict enough to prevent any problems from arising.

Their Secessionist "States Rights" versus Our Collaborative Federalism

There have recently been a wave of rightwing resolutions asserting "state sovereignty," with Governor Rick Perry even evoking Civil War-era rhetoric about Texas having the right to secede from the United States. 

Bigotry is not an American value

Now more than ever, we need a rational and respectful dialogue about how to fix our country’s broken immigration system. But comments like Texas Representative Betty Brown’s recent assertion that legal Chinese American immigrants should adopt Anglophone names that are “easier for Americans to deal with” represents precisely the kind of divisive rhetoric that will keep us from such a levelheaded debate.

Brown’s callous suggestion that Chinese American citizens are not American is symptomatic of the veiled bigotry that underlies much of the immigration debate across the nation. It also begs the question of why state legislators across the country would want to associate with the organization that Brown helped found to propagate racially divisive policies.