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Ohio

Voting by Mail: Ending Long Lines, Hanging Chads, & Paperless Elections

In a Nation article right after the 2004 election, scholar James Galbraith denounced the long lines in Ohio that prevented so many people from voting. "It is an injustice, an outrage and a scandal--a crime, really--that American citizens should have to wait for hours in the November rain in order to exercise the simple right to vote."

Corporate Tax Subsidies and Taxpayer Standing

Some court decisions come to the right result for the wrong reasons. Today's Supreme Court decision in DaimlerChrysler v. Cuno is a perfect example. The case involved whether states could offer certain corporate subsidies to entice businesses to open plants. The corporate subsidies involved are terrible policy, but it's just as well that the Supreme Court, especially this increasingly rightwing one, isn't taking on the job of second-guessing economic decisions by state leaders.

Ohio: ALEC Says, "It Wasn't Me!"

The Cleveland Free Times takes a long, hard look at the American Legislative Exchange Council's (ALEC) operating methods in Ohio. As usual, it ain't pretty. The right-wing, corporate-funded network of state legislators is exposed quite thoroughly.

OH: Was it ALEC or Not?

The Cleveland Free Times takes a long, hard look at ALEC's operating methods. As usual, it ain't pretty.
In 1994 marketing materials, ALEC billed itself as "a genuine opportunity for American business to achieve greater public policy effectiveness." In an arrangement not unlike "ladies night" at a bar, ALEC's 2,400 "legislator members" pay a nominal $25 in annual dues. Major corporations, however, shell out between $5,000 and $50,000 for a seat at the table.

Vouchers and Virtual Schools

While Ohio and a few other states have established statewide voucher systems, the voucher movement has generally been moving forward more incrementally through privately-managed charter schools and what are known as "virtual charter schools", online teaching programs combining aspects of home schooling with corporate privatization.

The Minimum Wage, Conservative Posturing, and Progressive Success

Fully aware that their anti-worker policies are anathema to most Americans, corporate conservatives often posture and position themselves on worker issues to avoid bearing the full brunt of the backlash from their noxious positions and to try to fix blame on their opponents, who really are working for the common interest.

OH: Corporate Conservatives Posture on Minimum Wage

Fully aware that their anti-worker policies are anathema to most Americans, corporate conservatives often posture and position themselves on worker issues to avoid bearing the full brunt of the backlash from their noxious positions and to try to fix blame on their opponents, who really are working for the common interest. There is probably no better example of this toxic behavior than what is happening in Ohio.

Supremes May Undercut State Tax Powers

State governments offer businesses tens of billions in tax incentives each year to invest in their states-- corporate subsidies that many advocates see as wasteful giveways but that others see as a lifeline for their communities.

Feds Propose Gutting State Protections Against Predatory Lending

North Carolina was the first state to pass a law reining in shady predatory lending practices, such as steep prepayment penalties, balloon payments and the sale of high-cost loans to borrowers who could qualify for lower rates. Soon a number of other states followed with similar laws and the result, according to a new study, is that homeowners now save $9.1 billion per year.

IDing the Real Problem and Preventing Voter Intimidation

The right wing has a magnificent tendency to solve problems that don't exist in a way that tilts the playing field for their own side. For the latest example, we need look no further than Pennsylvania, where Governor Ed Rendell is poised to veto legislation that serves little real purpose other than helping conservatives build power. As Tom Ferrick, Jr., aptly described, HB1318 would have made it less likely that low-income citizens were voting by instituting rigorous ID requirements and shutting down polling places. The regulations are a joke as fraud is extremely rare, but the provisions being advanced are widely acknowledged to undermine turnout among low-income and urban residents.