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Rhode Island

State Legislators & Partners in Action: Here’s What Happened!

The 2014 National Week of Action for Real Prosperity took place the second week of April and it was a huge success! Spearheaded by PSN’s Economic Security Working Group, the Week of Action engaged over 50 legislators in 20 states

Rhode Island Sen. Gayle Goldin: Equal Pay For Women Means Real Prosperity For Middle Class

In an op-ed, Rhode Island State Senator Gayle Goldin writes that to create real prosperity for all, we must demand that jobs pay a living and equitable wage, create pathways to success, and recognize the complexity of balancing a career while managing a family.

MomsRising & State Legislators Team Up to Shine A Light On The High Cost Of Low Wages & Benefits For Families

Today, as part of the National Week of Action, 12 state legislators are participating in a Blog Carnival sponsored by MomsRising. State legislators from across the country are blogging about economic security issues important to America's working. From Arizona to Massachusetts, state legislators are taking action on the need to guarantee paid family leave and earned sick days, as well as raise the minimum wage.

Great Futures for All Rhode Island Students

It is a concern that lawmakers across the states are continuing to hear from families and teachers: their youngest constituents are over-tested, forced into focusing heavily on high-stakes test scores at the expense of gaining high-order thinking skills, building complex reasoning abilities, and enjoying a well-rounded education. Rhode Island is no stranger to the concerns. In fact, with a new testing graduation requirement implemented by the Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education this year, the stakes have soared for the state's students. Specifically, the new policy ties receiving a high school diploma to performance on the controversial New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) exam, which was never intended to be a graduation requirement. As a result of the new requirement, approximately 4000 students are at risk of not graduating next year.

On Marriage Equality, Eight Years = 180 Degrees

Eight years ago, progressives were recovering from an Election Day that saw a full 11 states ban same-sex marriage at the polls. The environment in early 2013 could not be more different. Coming off of historic successes at the polls in four states in November, momentum behind marriage equality efforts continues to grow in state after state in advance of what is likely to be a landmark Supreme Court decision on the issue this term:

Take-It-or-Leave-It Approach to Pensions Threatens Retirees in Rhode Island

A pension debate in Rhode Island this fall could set the stage for how dozens of other states take up the issue when regular sessions resume in 2012. As Progressive States Network reported last month, calls for dramatic changes to public pension systems and social security are largely an opportunistic move by conservatives to advance a privatization and anti-tax agenda. The debate playing out in Rhode Island has turned into another unfortunate instance of this, driven by a take-it-or-leave-it proposal by State Treasurer Gina Raimando – a venture capitalist by trade – that would slash benefits and partially privatize the system. To support the proposal, a newly formed lobbying organization supported by financiers and business lobbyists is running a full-press political campaign that is choking out discussion of more reasonable alternatives.

The Poverty Institute

Poverty Institute Updates, News and Legislative Tracking

Conservatives Continue To Push Voter Suppression In States Despite Potential $140 Million Price Tag

As voter ID legislation continues to be rammed through state legislatures across the country, conservatives are celebrating passage of these bills, intended to suppress turnout among traditionally progressive constituencies, as a victory. However, no one is actually winning – not minority, low-income, and other historically disenfranchised voters who will be disproportionately affected by the new laws, and certainly not already-squeezed state budgets forced to find millions of dollars to make these bills a reality