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Abusive Surveillance Is an LGBTQ Rights Issue

This piece originally ran at Slate's Outward blog.
Barred from employment with the federal government. Considered mentally ill by the psychiatric profession. Seen as criminals under state laws. Subjected to invasive surveillance and targeting by the FBI.

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The Kids Aren’t Alright: America Fails to Protect Youth in Crisis

Earlier this year, I sat in an immigration office in Nogales, Mexico, surrounded by children who had just been deported from the United States. All of the children I spoke with, ranging in age from 11 to 17 years old, traveled to the United States alone before U.S. Border Patrol agents arrested them. They spoke of being cold, hungry, and afraid while in American detention cells.

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New Court Orders Signal More Drone Documents Are on the Way

This was originally posted on Just Security.

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How Riley v. California Impacts Texas

In Riley v. California, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the police generally may not, without a warrant, search digital information on a cell phone seized following arrest. The Court reasoned that cell phones are different from other kinds of things people carry on their persons. Your cell phone is like a detailed diary that can reveal highly personal information going back years. It makes sense, that the Court concluded, to give cell phones extra protection by requiring a warrant. The case got us thinking about privacy protections generally. So what’s the law here in Texas?

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How the NSA Got Away with Spying on American–Muslim Civil Rights Activists

An article published by The Intercept this week revealed that the government has conducted surveillance of several prominent American Muslims—including a former official in the Department of Homeland Security, a professor at Rutgers University, and the executive director of the largest Muslim civil rights organization in the country.

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An FBI Counterterrorism Agent Tracked Me Down Because I Took a Picture of This

This is a statement from one of the plaintiffs speaking at Thursday's press conference announcing the ACLU's lawsuit challenging the government's controversial Suspicious Activity Reporting program.

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You Heard the Court, Gov. Brewer: Give the DREAMers Their Licenses

Until now, thousands of young Arizonans have been prevented from getting jobs, going to school, or even attending to sick children – all thanks to Gov. Jan Brewer's ban on granting them driver's licenses.

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I Was 16 and in Solitary Before I Ever Even Went to Trial

February is cold in Northern Virginia. It's even colder when you're in a cell alone, without a mattress, a blanket, a pillow, or a sheet.

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Doing Right by the Unaccompanied Children on Our Border

There are children in cages along the U.S.-Mexico border right now. And more are showing up every day.

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Suing to Defend Americans’ Right to Take Pictures in Public

What does an 86-year-old art photographer have in common with a young man with a video game habit?
Not just a proclivity for perfectly innocuous hobbies, unfortunately. These days, engaging in either activity can get the FBI on your case.

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