Navigation

Vermont

Film Screening Tomorrow Night


Tomorrow join the Peace & Justice Center and Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) for a screening of the documentary “Orgasm Inc” at the Friends Meeting House (173 North Prospect St) at 6:30 p.m. An inter-generational discussion between WILPF and younger generations of feminist activists will follow the screening. Get ready to talk about the film, and Liz Canner’s upcoming visit to UVM campus to discuss her newest film on the Dartmouth College rape cases.

Original Author: 
P

A new year starts in July

July 1 marks the beginning of Vermont’s fiscal year, and our FY2015 Vermont State Budget Chartbook shows the milestones in the development of the budget for the new fiscal year. The final $5.59 billion appropriations bill for this year represents a 4.1 percent increase ($222 million) over adjusted spending for fiscal 2014. (Midway through each fiscal year, typically in January or February, the Legislature makes changes to various expenditures it had authorized in the original appropriations bill.)

Original Author: 
P

A new year starts in July

July 1 marks the beginning of Vermont’s fiscal year, and our FY2015 Vermont State Budget Chartbook shows the milestones in the development of the budget for the new fiscal year. The final $5.59 billion appropriations bill for this year represents a 4.1 percent increase ($222 million) over adjusted spending for fiscal 2014. (Midway through each fiscal year, typically in January or February, the Legislature makes changes to various expenditures it had authorized in the original appropriations bill.)

Original Author: 
P

Drones 101 Presentation and Screening of Wounds of Waziristan in Barre

On Monday, July 14th from 6pm to 7:30pm join Central Vermont WILPF and the Peace & Justice Center at the Aldrich Public Library, 6 Washington Street in Barre for an evening of education and discussion centered on drones as a political and moral issue. The evening will begin with the Peace & Justice Center’s “Drones 101 Presentation” created by Lydia Bates and presented by Michaela Herrmann.

Original Author: 
P

Opening the White Curtain

By Andréa Martin, PJC Intern
Part of why I am so proud to call myself a Vermonter is because my state has always been a progressive leader. In July of 1777, we became the first colony to outlaw slavery. But was racial justice really addressed then and is it addressed today? Nearly 240 years later, why is it that I only just begun to realize that racism still exists?

Original Author: 
P

A different sort of 4th of July event…

Original Author: 
P

Good Workplace Practices Lead to a Vibrant Economy

As state legislatures across the country wrap up their deliberative sessions it’s a good time to review what they accomplished on behalf of working families and small businesses. From Minnesota to Hawaii, states considered and passed minimum wage increases. States also looked at providing seniors with a more secure retirement and low-income workers with the safety of paid leave for illness or family care. These policies represent our vision for the economy, one that is pro-worker and pro-business and makes our workplaces healthier, drives more customers to local businesses, secures a future of prosperity for workers of all ages, and grows our country’s economy.

Creating Liberty and Justice One Kid at a Time

Although we would all like to think of the United States as a country where liberty and justice is actually for all, in the twenty-first century this still remains only an idea. Everyday in the U.S., individuals of minority groups experience discrimination and microaggression based on their race, religious beliefs, political affiliation, sexual orientation and more. And yet, here we are in the Green Mountain State, proud of our progress toward equality and the protection of the environment.

Original Author: 
P

Connecticut the Latest State to Allow Driver's Licenses for Immigrants

With comprehensive immigration reform continuing its arduous path through Congress, states continue to work on their own tracks, passing reasonable, humane, and economically beneficial immigration policies. In addition to measures like tuition equity, this includes bills that allow undocumented immigrants access to driver's licenses. This week, Connecticut became the latest state to pass such a bill, while California saw bipartisan support emerge for theirs -- yet more evidence of how the politics around immigration reform may be shifting:

With Congress a Morass, States Continue to Look at Gun Violence and Immigration

This past week was saturated with crisis and tragedy following the events in Boston and Texas, but it also saw significant developments on two critical issues before the U.S. Senate that would likely have otherwise fully gripped the nation's attention. On guns, an already-weakened bipartisan compromise on universal background checks was blocked in the Senate by a minority of senators, ending for now the fight to pass any federal legislation in the wake of the Newtown tragedy. On immigration, the long-awaited full text of the so called "Gang of 8" immigration bill was released, drawing support from the White House, conditional praise from some advocates, and stoking opposition among anti-immigrant forces. With the ability of Congress to pass legislation on any major issue now perhaps even more in question, both issues also continued to play out on the state level this week as well: